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World War I

1917 is effectively a feature length stunt. As the camera follows two young British World War I soldiers from their camp to the trenches to trudging across a field to a house in a field (etc. etc.) yo…
Movies have always had the powerful ability to not only entertain, but to inform. Movies can bring attention to little-acknowledged moments of history, whether good or bad, by telling a story that wil…
Directed by and starring Russell Crowe, The Water Diviner is an ambitious film that incorporates elements of romance, adventure, tragedy, action, and drama. You could simply call it a war movie, but r…
The novel by Michael Morpurgo is set during the First World War and told from the horse’s point of view. The live-theater incarnation features a glorious mechanical horse puppet that, over the course …
Even after a century, it is surprising how many great stories can be mined from World War I. It is now truly in the past, as there are (most likely at least) very few, if any, people that fought durin…
This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, or the Great War, as it was known at the time. It was a modern war that coincided with the explosion of early Hollywood filmmak…
Young Harry Potter gets to stretch his legs in this made-for-TV historical drama, and redeems himself quite nicely, I must say. In fact, except for the initial jolt of recognition when he first appear…
If it weren't for the fact that The Big Parade came out in 1925, four years before the first Oscar was awarded, it would probably now be included as part of that shortlist of films that have won piles…
The story follows a group of young Germans who, swept up in a tide of patriotism, join the military to fight for the fatherland in World War I. It is first unclear whom the story is going to follow, b…
There are many Best Picture winners, true classics from Golden Age of Hollywood, that stand the test of time, like Gone With the Wind, It Happened One Night, or Rebecca. Then you have movies like Cava…
Though I am often swayed and a bit star-struck when a director I admire—in this case Jean-Pierre Jeunet (City of Lost Children, Amélie)—is presenting his own film, as was the case of the screening of …